Eye Conditions

  • Age-related macular degeneration: A loss of central vision.

  • Amblyopia (lazy eye): One eye sees better than the other as a result of not using the other eye during childhood. The weaker eye may or may not “wander.” The weaker eye is called the "lazy eye."

  • Astigmatism: A defect that causes an inability to properly focus light onto the retina. Astigmatism causes blurry vision that can be corrected with glasses, contact lenses, or, in some cases, surgery.

  • Black eye: Swelling and discoloration (bruise) around the eye as a result of injury to the face.

  • Blepharitis: Inflammation of the eyelids near the eyelashes. Blepharitis is a common cause of itching or a feeling of grit in the eyes.

  • Cataract: A clouding of the natural internal lens of the eye, which can cause blurred vision.

  • Chalazion: An oil-making gland gets blocked and swells into a bump.

  • Conjunctivitis: Also known as "pinkeye,” conjunctivitis is an infection or inflammation of the conjunctiva, the clear layer that covers the front of the eye. It is usually caused by allergies, a virus, or a bacterial infection.

  • Corneal abrasion: A scratch on the clear part of the front of the eye. Pain, light sensitivity, or a feeling of grit in the eye are the usual symptoms.

  • Diabetic retinopathy: High blood sugar damages blood vessels in the eye. Eventually, weakened blood vessels may start leaking or overgrow the retina, threatening vision.

  • Diplopia (double vision): Seeing double can be caused by many serious conditions. Diplopia requires immediate medical attention.

  • Dry eye: Either the eyes don’t produce enough tears, or the tears are of poor quality. Dry eye can be caused by medical problems such as lupus, scleroderma, and Sjogren's syndrome.

  • Glaucoma: Progressive loss of vision usually associated with increased pressure inside the eye. Peripheral vision is lost first, often going undetected for years.

  • Hyperopia (farsightedness): Inability to see near objects clearly. The eye is “too short” for the lens, or certain eye muscles have weakened with age.

  • Hyphema: Bleeding into the front of the eye, between the cornea and the iris. Hyphema is usually caused by trauma.

  • Keratitis: Inflammation or infection of the cornea. Keratitis typically occurs after germs enter a corneal abrasion.

  • Myopia (nearsightedness): Inability to see clearly at a distance. The eye is “too long” for the lens, so light isn’t focused properly on the retina.

  • Optic neuritis: The optic nerve becomes inflamed, usually from an overactive immune system. Painful vision loss in one eye typically results.

  • Pterygium: A thickened conjunctival mass usually on the inner part of the eyeball. It may cover a part of the cornea, causing vision problems.

  • Retinal detachment: The retina comes loose from the back of the eye. Trauma and diabetes are common causes of this problem, which often requires urgent surgical repair.

  • Retinitis: Inflammation or infection of the retina. Retinitis may be a long-term genetic condition or result from an infection.

  • Scotoma: A blind or dark spot in the visual field.

  • Strabismus: The eyes do not point in the same direction. The brain may then favor one eye, causing decreased vision (amblyopia) in the other eye.

  • Stye: Bacteria infect the skin on the edge of the eyelid, creating a tender red bump.

  • Uveitis (iritis): The colored part of the eye becomes inflamed or infected. An overactive immune system, bacteria, or viruses can be responsible